12 Summer Safety Tips for the Elderly

  Prepare yourself or older friends and family members for the sweltering summer months.   The summertime is a time of fun and relaxation for most people. But for seniors, the heat and sun can be dangerous if the proper precautions aren’t taken. Here are some great tips that the elderly, as well as their caregivers, can use to make sure they have a fun, safe summer. Stay Hydrated Seniors are more susceptible to dehydration than younger people because they lose their ability to conserve water as they age. They also can become less aware of their thirst and have difficulty adjusting to temperature changes. Remember to drink water often, and be sure to pack some for those long summer drives.Dr. William Greenough, of Johns Hopkins Geriatric...

Spreading Cancer Caught on Film

    The way in which every single cancer cell spreads around the body has been captured in videos by a team in Japan. The normal body tissues show up as green, while the cancer comes out as intense red spots. The team, at the University of Tokyo and the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center, says the technology will help explain the deadly process. The research is on mice so far, but it is hoped the method could one day help with treatment too.  The spread of cancer around the body is a crucial moment called metastasis. Before a cancer spreads it is easier to contain and cure, afterwards it is incredibly difficult. The tumour itself has to evolve so bits of it are able to break free, survive travelling in the blood stream and invade new...

Sharp Focus on Alzheimer’s May Help Target Drugs

  Abnormal deposits that build up in the brain during Alzheimer’s have been pictured in unprecedented detail by UK scientists. The team at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology says its findings “open up a whole new era” in neurodegenerative disease. Their work should make it easier to design drugs to stop brain cells dying.  The researchers used brain tissue from a 74-year-old woman who died after having Alzheimer’s disease. The form of dementia leads to tangles of a protein called tau spreading throughout the brain. The more tau tangles there are, the worse the symptoms tend to be. Doctors have known this has happened for decades but what has been missing is a detailed understanding of what the tangles look like. The team...

How a Healthy Diet can Help Seniors with Mesothelioma

Most Americans don’t know where to go for trustworthy nutritional guidance. We’ve received numerous conflicting messages for decades, and now we don’t know who to trust for dietary recommendations. Cancer patients are especially nervous about dietary choices, fearing the food they eat could fuel cancer growth. This isn’t exactly true, but a diet filled with processed foods instead of whole, fresh foods won’t help you recover well from cancer treatment. Seniors with malignant mesothelioma, a type of cancer caused by asbestos exposure, can benefit from healthy dietary choices. A good diet will boost energy, improve mood and help seniors handle the side effects of cancer treatment. A few cancer patients have claimed control of their cancer using diet alone....

Why Greek Mountain Villagers Have Healthy Hearts

Elderly villagers are well known for their good health and long lives Scientists have pinpointed one reason why people living in isolated villages in Greece may enjoy long and healthy lives. They found a new genetic variant, common among villagers, which appears to protect the heart by lowering levels of “bad” fats and cholesterol. Despite a diet rich in animal fat, the people of Mylopotamos in northern Crete do not suffer from cardiovascular disease. And they really love their cheese. What’s special about these Greek villages? The isolated villages of Zoniana and Anogia are high up in the mountains on the island of Crete. Few people move in or out of the villages and the inhabitants are known for living well into old age. Heart problems,...

The Secret to Living a Long Healthy Life—EAT LESS

In a restaurant setting sometime in the not-too distant future, a man and a woman are on their first date. After the initial nerves subside, all is going well. The man is 33, he says, has been single for most of those years, and, although he doesn’t mention it, knows he is looking to settle down and have a family. The woman replies that she is 52, has been married, divorced, and has children in their early 20s. He had no idea – she looked his age, or younger. This is a dream of Julie Mattison from the National Institute on Ageing (NIA) in the United States. She envisions a time when chronological age ticks by with every year, but biological age can be set to a different timer, where elderly doesn’t mean what it does now. It sounds far-fetched, but our...